31
OCT
2014
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Orlando Health General Surgery Residency Program

Welcome

The Department of Surgical Education at Orlando Health is dedicated to graduate medical education, offering a five-year, fully accredited general surgery residency program as well as accredited fellowships in surgical critical care and colon and rectal surgery. The department also offers a one-year fellowship in acute care surgery.

The residency structure includes five categorical first-year positions and six non-designated preliminary. There are five categorical residents at each subsequent year. Preliminary candidates are hired for a one-year period .

Orlando Health has formal affiliations with the University of Florida College of Medicine, the University of Central Florida, and the University of North Dakota.

The program is based at Orlando Regional Medical Center (ORMC) which provides a total of 801 acute-care beds, greater than 18,000 operative procedures, and 80,000 emergency visits annually - an ideal environment for the education of our resident staff. The majority of surgical training occurs at Orlando Regional Medical Center , Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children and Dr. P. Phillips Hospital. The campus serves as a major referral center for Central Florida and includes a designated Level One Trauma Center with more than 4,300 trauma admissions per year, the Air Care Team helicopter transport service and the regional Burn Intensive Care Unit .


2012-2013 House Staff

Department Faculty

The Department of Surgical Education at Orlando Regional Medical Center is staffed by nine full-time Surgical Directors.


Michael Cheatham, MD, FACS, FCCM
Director, Surgical/Trauma Intensive Care Unit
Program Director, General Surgery Residency
Program Director, Surgical Critical Care Fellowship

Dr. Cheatham completed both his general surgery residency and surgical critical care fellowship at Vanderbilt University. He is board certified in general surgery, with added qualifications in surgical critical care.

Dr. Cheatham's research interests include advanced hemodynamic monitoring, shock resuscitation, abdominal compartment syndrome, disaster preparedness, and third-world medicine. He is active in a number of national and international surgical, trauma, and critical care societies. He is the past president of the World Society for Abdominal Compartment Syndrome.



Mark S. Roh, MD, FACS
Academic Chairman, Department of Surgery

Dr. Roh completed his surgical residency at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. He also completed a clinical and research fellowship in surgical oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He served for 10 years as chief of liver tumor surgery at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston before becoming chairman of surgery at Allegheny General Hospital. He received a master's degree in medical management from the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business.

Dr. Roh is the executive editor of the Annals of Surgical Oncology. He is the associate director of medical affairs at the National Surgical Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP), an NIH supported clinical trials foundation. Dr. Roh is published widely in peer-reviewed journals and has lectured nationally and internationally.



Pat B. Quijada, MD, FACS
Associate Director, Surgical Education

Dr. Quijada completed his surgical residency at ORMC with additional postgraduate training at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He is board certified in general surgery.



Matt W. Lube, MD, FACS
Director, Outpatient Center for Surgery
Associate Director, Surgical Education

Dr. Lube completed his general surgery residency and surgical critical care fellowship at ORMC. He is board certified in general surgery with added qualifications in surgical critical care. He is the past president of the Florida Society of Critical Care Medicine.

Dr. Lube practices general and acute care surgery. He serves as the clerkship director for General Surgery for the University of Central Florida, College of Medicine.


Howard G. Smith, MD, FACS, FCCM
Director, Burn Services

Dr. Smith completed his general surgery residency at Indiana University and his surgical critical care fellowship at the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital. He is board certified in general surgery with added qualifications in surgical critical care.



John T. Promes, MD, FACS, FCCM
Director, Trauma Services
Associate Director, Surgical Education

Dr. Promes completed his general surgery residency at the Washington Hospital Center and completed his surgical critical care fellowship at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He is board certified in general surgery with added qualifications in surgical critical care.



Rodrigo F. Alban, MD
Associate Director, Surgical Education

Dr. Alban completed his general surgery residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. He completed a Surgical Critical Care Fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He is board certified in general surgery with added qualifications in surgical critical care.



Chadwick P. Smith, MD
Associate Director, Surgical Education

Dr. Smith completed his general surgery residency and surgical critical care fellowship at ORMC. He is board certified in general surgery and eligible for added qualifications in surgical critical care.



Joseph A. Ibrahim, MD

Dr. Joseph Ibrahim completed his general surgery residency at East Tennessee State University and his surgical critical care fellowship at ORMC. He is board certified in general surgery with added qualifications in surgical critical care.



Raj Nair, MD

Dr. Nair completed his surgical residency at ORMC. Upon graduation, he went to Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida for a fellowship in surgical oncology. Dr. Nair oversees the general surgery tumor board grand rounds each month. He is board certified for general surgery.


Application Process & Resident Contract

The ERAS application is considered complete when the personal statement, USMLE Step I and II scores, three letters of recommendation, medical school transcripts and Dean's Letter have been received.

Applicants must be invited before an interview can be scheduled. Interviews generally take place between November and January. The Department of Surgical Education and Orlando Health participates and complies fully with the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) rules and regulations. All available positions are for the standard July through June residency period. The Department of Surgical Education does not sponsor Visas.

ERAS application forms for the general surgery residency program are accepted September 1 through November 15 each year.

Orlando Health
Department of Surgical Education

86 W. Underwood Street ~ Suite 201
Orlando, Florida 32806

For a copy of Orlando Health's Resident Contract please click here .

Resident Experience

The General Surgery Residency at Orlando Regional Medical Center (ORMC) consists of rotations through a variety of surgical disciplines. The program is based on the traditional residency concept of progressive responsibility for patient care. This ultimately leads to the PGY-V year when, as chief of one of the general surgery teaching services, a resident is responsible for all patient care management and decision-making on their service. The majority of the surgery training occurs on the main campus of ORMC. Overall, the program provides an excellent, well-rounded clinical experience in general surgery.

Residents are expected to complete at least one research project that leads to presentation and publication during their five years in the program.

Each year of the surgical residency is divided into the following rotations:

PGY-I (Categorical)

  • Acute Care Surgery (two months)
  • Vascular Surgery (one month)
  • General Surgery (four months)
  • Radiology / Pathology (two weeks / two weeks)
  • Burn Service (one month)
  • Pediatric Surgery (one month)
  • Night Float (two months)

PGY-II

  • Acute Care Surgery (two months)
  • Vascular Surgery (one month)
  • Surgical Critical Care (two months)
  • General Surgery (four months)
  • Pediatric Surgery (one month)
  • Plastic Surgery (one month)
  • Colorectal Surgery (one month)
  • Night Float (one month)

PGY-III

  • Vascular Surgery (two months)
  • Surgical Critical Care (two months)
  • Colorectal Surgery (one month)
  • Pediatric Surgery (two months)
  • Head and Neck Surgery (one month)
  • Transplant Surgery (one month)
  • General Surgery (three months)
  • Acute Care Surgery (two months)
  • Night Float (one month)

PGY-IV

  • General Surgery (four months)
  • Vascular Surgery (one month)
  • Thoracic Surgery (two months)
  • Acute Care Surgery (two months)
  • Colon and Rectal Surgery (one month)
  • Transplant (one month)
  • Night Float (one month)

PGY-V (Chief Resident)

  • Acute Care Surgery (two months)
  • Vascular Surgery (two months)
  • General Surgery (five months)
  • Thoracic Surgery (one month)
  • Night Float (two months)

Conference Schedule

Basic/Clinical Science/SCORE Conference
Wednesday mornings

6:30am - 7:30am

Grand Rounds
Friday mornings

7:00am - 8:00am

Mortality and Morbidity conference
Friday mornings

8:00am - 9:00am

Journal Club
3rd Thursday each month

6:30am - 7:30am

Competency Conference
3rd Friday each month
(for ten months)

9:00am - 9:45am

Surgical Critical Care
Evidence-Based Medicine Guideline Development
Tuesday

12:00pm - 1:00pm

Surgical Critical Care Teaching Conference
Wednesday

12:00pm - 1:00pm

 

General Surgery Teaching Service

The General Surgery Teaching Service is divided into two teams, each directed by a senior resident and their assigned attending surgeons. The average daily census between the two teams is approximately 30-40 patients. The residents on the Teaching Services participate fully in the overall care of their patients including pre-admission evaluation, admission, preoperative, operative, postoperative and post-hospital care, as all patients are followed in the Orlando Health Outpatient Center.

Acute Care Surgery Teams (ACS)

The ACS Team and General Surgery services admit up to 300 patients a month. The Team consists of a senior resident, a middle year resident and two-three intern level residents.

Private General Surgery Rotations

Residents in the program spend a significant portion of their time working closely with private general surgeons who are actively involved in the Department of Surgical Education. This involves pre- and post-hospital evaluation of general surgery and surgical oncology patients in the private surgeon's offices, as well as in-hospital management and operative experience. Most of these surgeons have offices on the hospital campus.

Surgical Critical Care (SCC)

Each resident receives extensive experience in management of the critically ill surgical patient through daily walk rounds in the various intensive care units, as well as dedicated rotations on the SCC Service. These rotations involve one-on-one teaching between the resident and each of the five SCC attendings, with further teaching from the SCC and Trauma Fellows. Residents completing the program are well trained in resuscitation, ventilator management, use and insertion of invasive monitoring catheters, antibiotic therapy and surgical nutrition.

 

ORMC has an extensive medical library that contains the majority of commonly referenced medical journals, as well as current editions of major textbooks. Journals not immediately available in the library's collections are rapidly obtained through a shared resource arrangement with other libraries throughout the country to provide affiliated healthcare professionals with needed books and journal articles not readily available locally. Online access to Medline for literature searches is readily available.

Orlando Health Level One Trauma Center

The Trauma Center contains state-of-the-art operating rooms, intensive care units and an emergency department. Call rooms and resident offices are also located in this building. While on duty, all meals are provided free of charge. Most all ancillary work is handled by hospital employees. An attending radiologist is "in-house" on a 24-hour basis, providing immediate consultation for trauma and surgical emergencies.

An on-campus fitness center is available for a nominal charge. Reserved physician parking is provided on campus. Group insurance includes major medical, dental and vision.

Graduates
Fifty percent of our chief residents choose to do a fellowship following graduation. Recent graduates have obtained fellowship positions in colon and rectal, plastic, vascular and minimally invasive surgery, surgical critical care as well as surgical oncology. Of those residents who establish a general surgery practice following their training at ORMC, most choose to stay in the Central Florida area.

Surgical Critical Care (SCC) Fellowship

The program is a one-year ACGME approved clinical fellowship in Surgical Critical Care. Successful completion of the fellowship will qualify an individual to sit for the examination for the "Certificate of Added Qualifications in Surgical Critical Care" from the American Board of Surgery.

The Section of SCC in the Department of Surgical Education is staffed by six full-time, surgical critical care fellowship-trained surgeons. The Section provides consultative services for critically ill and high- risk surgical patients including pre-, peri-, and postoperative evaluation and management, as well as performance of bedside and operative procedures for high-risk and acutely ill patients. The SCC service, together with the general surgery residency program, provides 24-hour-a-day in-house physician management of critically ill patients.

The Section is recognized internationally as a clinical research center. Each of the faculty is actively involved in scientific research and together has published in excess of 200 abstracts, manuscripts, book chapters and other scholarly works. Each of the faculty also has a clinical appointment in the Department of Surgery at the University of Central Florida and the University of Florida in Gainesville.

Objectives of the Surgical Critical Care Fellowship

The program is designed to be heavily based on clinical practice and unit administration, but offers ample opportunity for clinical research to those who are interested. Individuals will spend 12 months in the surgical-trauma ICU. Elective rotations in the Pediatric and Medical Intensive Care Units may be arranged. Current research activities include the study of new oxygen transport and pulmonary monitoring technology, metabolic demands in critically ill patients, new treatments for sepsis, abdominal compartment syndrome and high-level ventilatory support for patients with acute respiratory failure. Fellows are expected to participate in clinical research projects and to submit abstracts to and attend the major critical care meetings each year.

Surgical/Trauma Intensive Care Unit (STICU)

The STICU at ORMC is a 14-bed multi-specialty surgical unit that is staffed to accommodate the demands of a Level One Trauma Center. There are approximately 2000 ICU admissions/year, with approximately 50-60 percent of these being trauma patients. The remaining 50 percent of admissions are divided among general surgery, vascular surgery and surgical subspecialties.

The unit is staffed with two fellows, one or two residents in general surgery, and one or two Emergency Medicine residents. There are also medical and physician assistant students assigned to the service. Call is taken on an every-third-night basis by all members of the SCC Service.

Neurosciences, Medical, and Burn Intensive Care Units

The SCC service is also actively involved in the care of patients in three other intensive care units as well as a Progressive Care Unit (PCU). The Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit (NSICU) is an eight-bed unit that specializes in the care of the brain-injured trauma patient as well as the postoperative neurosurgical patient. The unit provides continuous EEG monitoring as well as the latest in intracranial pressure monitoring technology. The Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) is an eight-bed unit devoted to care of the critically ill medicine patient. It is staffed by both the SCC Service as well as the Medical Critical Care Service, depending upon the patient's underlying disease process. The Burn Unit at ORMC has both intensive care and regular burn care beds. All critically ill patients in the Burn Unit are managed by the SCC Service. The PCU is a 20-bed surgical stepdown unit with ventilator capabilities that acts as a "bridge" for patients who no longer require a high level of critical care, but require close observation and monitoring and are not yet sufficiently stable for regular ward care. The SCC service frequently follows surgical patients who have been in the above ICUs after transfer to the PCU to ensure continued recovery from their injuries.

Trauma Fellowship

An optional second year of training in the care of trauma patients is designed for individuals interested in pursuing a career in trauma surgery. It allows the fellow broad opportunities to develop skills in research, administration and clinical practice. The exact execution of the year will vary based on the interests, talents and needs of the individual. All trauma fellows are considered junior teaching faculty. The individual takes trauma call in regular rotation with the other members of the trauma team. This usually entails one or two nights per week of in-house trauma call. This allows the fellow to develop and maintain skills in the care of critically ill patients and adds to the surgical skills required for the care of injured patients. In addition to reviewing and refining clinical management plans, the fellow is ultimately responsible for bed control, conducting daily teaching rounds and delivering lectures within the Department of Surgical Education. Opportunities exist to participate in retrospective and prospective clinical studies currently ongoing within the department. Fellows are expected to develop and pursue original scholarly activities during the fellowship.

Research (Past Five Years)

General Surgery and Surgical Education

  1. A pitfall of protracted surgery in the lithotomy position: lower extremity compartment syndrome. Chow CE, Friedell ML, Freeland MB, DeJesus, S. Am Surg 2007; 73(1)19-21.
  2. The death of George Washington: An end to the controversy. Cheatham ML. Am Surg 2008; 74:770-774.
  3. Guidelines for management of small bowel obstruction. Diaz JJ, Bokhari F, Block EFJ, et al. J Trauma 2008; 64:1651-1664.
  4. Successful early fascial closure of an open abdomen during pregnancy. Pappas PA, Cheatham ML, Quijada P, O'Leary T, Carlan SJ. Am Surg 2009; 75:183-4
  5. Starting up a simulation and skills lab: What do I need and what do I want? Friedell, M, Smith CD, Seymour NE, Scott DJ, Dunnington GL. Journal of Surgical Education 2010; 67(2):112-121
  6. Incarceration of a sessile uterine fibroid in an umbilical hernia during pregnancy. Seims AD, Lube MW. Hernia 2009; 13:309-11.
  7. Diagnosis of appendicitis in pregnancy. Freeland M, King E, Safcsak K, Durham R. Am Surg 198:753-758, 2009.
  8. Retrospective Evaluation of Residents' American Board of Surgery In-Service Training Examination (ABSITE) Scores as a Tool to Evaluate Changes Made in a Basic Science Curriculum. Lube MW, Borman KR, Fulbright AE, Friedell ML. Journal of Surgical Education 2010; 67(3):167-172
  9. The general surgery residency at Orlando Health: Past, present and future. Friedell, M. Am Surg 76 (1) 7-10 2010.
  10. Starting up a Simulation and Skills Lab: What do I Need and What do I Want? Friedell, ML, Smith, CD, Seymour, NE, Scott, DJ, Dunnington, GL . Journal of Surgical Education 2010; 67(2):112-121.
  11. A Primer on How to Select Osteopathic Applicants to an Allopathic Residency. Schenarts PJ, Termuhlen PM, Pasley J, Rose JS, Biester T, Friedell ML. Journal of Surgical Education 2011; 68(3):239-245
  12. Development of an Industry Relations Policy by the Association of Program Directors in Surgery: A Report from the Finance Committee. Termuhlen PM, Damewood RB, Dent D, Fuhrman G, Haisch C, Nelson MT, Borman K, Friedell M. Journal of Surgical Education 2011; 68(5):347-349
  13. A Primer on Caribbean Medical Schools and Students. Friedell ML, Nelson LD, Marano MA. Journal of Surgical Education 2011; 68(4):328-334
  14. Strategies for the New Duty Hours Restrictions. Friedell ML, Farley, DR, Brothers, TE, Nadzam, G, Jarman, BT. Journal of Surgical Education 2011 (in press)

Vascular Surgery

  1. Carotid angioplasty and stenting is a safe and durable procedure in a community hospital. Friedell ML, Sandler BJ, Andriole JG, Cohen MJ, Martin SP, Howowitz JD. Am Surg 2007; 73(6) 543-47.
  2. Cerebral oximetry does not correlate with electroencephalography and somatosensory evoked potentials in determining the need for shunting during carotid endarterectomy. Friedell ML, Clark JM, Graham DA, Isley MR, Zhang XF. J Vasc Surg 2008; 48:601-6.
  3. Vena Cava Filter Practices of a Regional Vascular Surgery Society. Friedell ML, Nelson PR, Cheatham ML. Submitted to the Annals of Vascular Surgery.
  4. Predictors of Mortality with Blunt Thoracic Aortic Injury. Vincent, KB, Austin, JP, Patel, R, Friedell ML. Submitted to Vascular and Endovascular Surgery.

Trauma/Surgical Critical Care

  1. Results from the international consensus definitions conference on intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS): Part II recommendations. Malbrain MLNG, Cheatham ML, Kirkpatrick A, Sugrue M, Parr M, De Waele J, Balogh Z, Leppäniemi A, Olvera C, Ivatury R, D'Amours S, Wilmer A, Wendon J, Hillman K. Intensive Care Medicine 2007; 33(6):951-962.
  2. Shock: An overview. Cheatham ML, Block EFJ, Promes JT, Smith HG. In: Irwin RS, Cerra FB, Rippe JM, eds. Intensive Care Medicine. 6th Ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven, 2007, pp. 1831-1842.
  3. Traumatic renal artery occlusion in a patient with a solitary kidney: case report of treatment with endovascular stent and review of the literature. Dowling JM. Lube MW. Smith CP. Andriole J. Am Surg 2007; 73(4):351-3.
  4. Effect of patient positioning on intra-abdominal pressure monitoring. McBeth PB, Zygun DA, Widder S, Cheatham ML, Kirkpatrick AW. Am J Surgery 2007; 193: 644-647.
  5. Effect of patient positioning on intra-abdominal pressure monitoring. McBeth PB, Zygun DA, Widder S, Cheatham ML, Kirkpatrick AW. Am J Surgery 2007; 193: 644-647.
  6. Nitrogen balance, protein loss, and the open abdomen. Cheatham ML, Safcsak K, Brzezinski S, Lube MW. Crit Care Med 2007; 35(1):127-131.
  7. Biovailability of oral fluconazole in critically ill abdominal trauma patients with and without abdominal wall closure: A randomized crossover clinical trial. Barquist E, Gomez-Fein E, Block EFJ, et al. J Trauma 2007; 63:159-163.
  8. Recombinant factor VIIa as an adjunct to control hemorrhage from chest trauma in a Jehovah's Witness. Bhullar IS, Branman R, Block EFJ. Am Surg 2007; 73:818-819.
  9. Improved survival of critically ill trauma patients treated with recombinant human erythropoirtin. Napolitano LM, Fabian T, Bailey JA, Block EF, May AK, Corwin, HL. J Trauma 2007; 63:478.
  10. Resuscitation endpoints in severe sepsis: CVP, MAP, SvO2…and IAP. Cheatham ML. Crit Care Med 2008; 36:1012-1014.
  11. Intra-abdominal pressure monitoring during fluid resuscitation. Cheatham ML. Curr Opin Crit Care 2008; 14:327-333.
  12. The effect of different reference transducer positions on intra-abdominal pressure measurement: A multicenter analysis. De Waele JJ, Cheatham ML, De laet I, De Keulenaer BL, Widder S, Kirkpatrick AW, Cresswell AB, Malbrain M, Bodnar Z, Mejia-Mantilla JH, Reis Richard, Parr M, Schulze R, Puig S. Intensive Care Med 2008; 34:1299-303.
  13. Serial hemoglobin levels play no significant role in the decision-making process of nonoperative management of blunt splenic trauma. Bhullar IS, Braman R, Block EFJ. Am Surg 2008; 9:876-878.
  14. Subcutaneous linea alba fasciotomy: A less morbid treatment for abdominal compartment syndrome. Cheatham ML, Fowler J. Am Surg 2008; 74:746-749.
  15. Traumatic perforation of a duodenal diverticulum. Fowler J, Cheatham ML, Sandler B, Padron A. Am Surg 2008; 74:781-782.
  16. Are children really just small adults? Cheatham ML. Crit Care Med 2008; 36:2215-2216.
  17. Measuring intra-abdominal pressure outside the ICU: Validation of a simple bedside method. Cheatham ML, Fowler J. Am Surg 2008; 9:806-808.
  18. Long-Term Impact of Abdominal Decompression: A Prospective Comparative Analysis. Cheatham ML, Safcsak K. J American Coll Surg 2008; 207:573-579.
  19. Abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. Malbrain ML, Cheatham, ML. Core Topics in Cardiovascular Critical Care. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008 pp. 289-298.
  20. One hundred consecutive splenectomies for trauma: Is histologic evaluation really necessary? Fakhre GP, Berland T, Lube MW. J Trauma 2008; 64:1139-1141.
  21. Jugular venous air after basilar skull fracture. Anderson DR, Lube MW. J Trauma 2008; 64:847.
  22. Improved survival of critically ill trauma patients treated with recombinant human erythropoietin. Napolitano LM, Fabian TC,Block EFJ, et al. J Trauma 2008; 65:285-299.
  23. Nutritional support of the injured. Block EFJ, Lube MW. Trauma contemporary principles and therapy. Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Williams. 2008; 705-715.
  24. Dye pack injury causing third degree burns. Wroblewski RL, Smith HG. J Burn Care & Research. 2008, 29:406-407.
  25. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of intravenous ibuprofen in febrile patients. Morris P, Promes JT, Guntapalli K, Wright P, Bernard G. Crit Care Med 2008; 36:A18.
  26. Nonoperative management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. Cheatham ML. World J Surg 2009; 33:1116-22.
  27. Abdominal compartment syndrome. Cheatham ML. Curr Opin Crit Care 2009; 15:154-62.
  28. Classification, an important step to improve the management of patients with an open abdomen. Bjorck M, Bruhin A, Cheatham ML, Hinck D, Kaplan M, Manca G, Wild T, Windsor A. World J Surg 2009; 33:1154-1157.
  29. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome: pathophysiology and definitions. Cheatham ML. Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med 2009; 17:10-21.
  30. Intra-abdominal pressure measurements in lateral decubitus versus supine position. De Keulenaer BL, Cheatham ML, De Waele JJ, Kimball EJ, Powell B, Davis WA, Jenkins IR. Acta Clin Belg 2009; 64:210-215.
  31. The Impact of WSACS.Org on IAH/ACS education worldwide. Cheatham ML. Acta Clinica Belgica 2009; 64(3):120.
  32. Percutaneous drainage for intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome: A prospective cohort analysis. Cheatham ML, Safcsak K. Acta Clinica Belgica 2009; 64(3):120.
  33. Porcine dermis outperforms human dermis as a biologic mesh. Smith HG, Cheatham ML. Acta Clinica Belgica 2009; 64(3):117.
  34. Transpulmonary pressure (PTP) is necessary to measure pulmonary distending pressure in the presence of Intra-abdominal Hypertension (IAH). Silva H, Hunley C, Jimenez E, Falk J, Cheatham ML, Jones P, Barba J, Nieman G, Johannesen Z. Crit Care Med 2009; 16(suppl):A208.
  35. Animal age, weight, and anesthesia affect outcome in a clinically applicable porcine sepsis / ischemia reperfusion model. Silva H, Jimenez E, Falk J, Barba J, Cheatham ML, Bailey J, Hunley C, Johannesen Z, Nieman G. Crit Care Med 2009; 16(suppl):A213.
  36. Trauma Laparotomy: Evaluating the necessity of histological examination. Laituri C, Teixeira A, Lube MW, Seims A, Cravens J. American Surgeon 2009; 75: 1124-27.
  37. Is the evolving management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome improving survival? Cheatham ML, Safcsak K. Crit Care Med 2010; 38:402-407.
  38. Does Health Care Insurance Affect Outcomes After Traumatic Brain Injury? Analysis of the National Trauma Databank. Alban RF, Berry C, Ley E, Mirocha J, Margulies DR, Salim A. Am Surg. 2010 Oct;76(10):1108-11
  39. Serum Ethanol Levels in patients with Moderate to SevereTraumatic Brain Injury Influence Outcomes: A Surprising Finding. Berry C, Salim A, Alban RF, Mirocha J, Margulies DR, Ley EJ. Am Surg. 2010 Oct;76(10):1067-70
  40. A novel device for measuring intermittent and continuous intragastric pressure in patients with intra-abdominal hypertension. Cheatham ML, Safcsak K. Crit Care Med 37:A262, 2010.
  41. Abthera™ open abdomen negative pressure system versus Barker’s vacuum pack technique: Analysis of resource utilization. Safcsak K, Cheatham ML. Amer Surg 77:S106, 2011.
  42. Can burn patients survive following open abdominal decompression? Smith HG, Safcsak K, Cheatham ML, Lube MW. Amer Surg 77:S111, 2011.
  43. The evolution of early fluid management and the open abdomen. Smith CP, Alban RF, Safcsak K, Fiscina C, DuCoin C, Cheatham ML. Amer Surg 77:S106, 2011.
  44. Effects of race and insurance on outcomes of the open abdomen. Alban RF, Clark J, Safcsak K, Smith CP, Cheatham ML. Amer Surg 77:S94, 2011.
  45. A prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial of IV-ibuprofen for treatment of fever and pain in burn patients. Promes JT, Safcsak K, Pavliv L, Voss B, Rock A. J of Burn Care and Research 32:79-90, 2011.
  46. Advanced age may limit the survival benefit of open abdominal decompression. Cheatham ML, Safcsak K, Fiscina C, DuCoin C, Smith HG, Promes JT, Lube MW. Amer Surg 77:856-861, 2011.
  47. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome: The journey forward. Cheatham ML, Safcsak K. Amer Surg 77:S1-S5, 2011.
  48. Long-term implications of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome: Physical, mental and financial. Cheatham ML, Safcsak K, Sugrue M. Amer Surg 77:S78-S82, 2011.
  49. Intra-abdominal pressure measurement using a U-Tube Technique: Caveat Emptor! De Waele JJ, Cheatham ML, Balogh Z, Bjorck M, D’Amours S, Keulenaer B, Ivatury R, Kirkpatrick AW, Leppaniemi A, Malbrain M, Sugrue M. Annals of Surgery 2010 252: 889-891.
  50. Diazepam as a component of goal-directed sedation in critically ill trauma patients. Gesin G, Kane-Gill SL, Dasta JF, Birrer KL, Kolnik LJ, Cheatham ML. J Crit Care 2010;26(2):122-126
  51. A Prospective, Observational Study of Xigris Use in the United States (XEUS). XEUS Investigators. Steingrub JS, Cheatham ML, Woodward B, Wang HT, Effron MB; J Crit Care 2010; 25(4):660.e9-16.
  52. The abdominal compartment syndrome. Malbrain ML, Cheatham ML, Sugrue M, Ivatury R. In: O’Donnell JM, Nácul FE, eds. Surgical Intensive Care Medicine. 2nd Ed. New York: Springer, 2010, pp.507-528.

Colon and Rectal Surgery

  1. Stapled Transanal Rectal Resection vs Transvaginal Rectocele Repair for Treatment of Obstructive Defecation Syndrome. Harris MA, Ferrara A, Gallagher JT, DeJesus S, Williamson PR, Larach SW. Dis Col Rectum 2009; 52: 592-594
  2. A Metastatic Colon Cancer Model Using nonoperative Transanal Rectal Injection. Donigan M, Loh BD, Norcross LS, Li S, Williamson PR, DeJesus S, Ferrara A, Gallagher JT, Baker CH. Surg Endoscopy 2009; online publication
  3. Role of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the Growth of CT26 Colorectal Cancer in a Murine Model. Bahna H, Ferrara A, Donigan M, Loh B, Norcross LS, Aversa J, Williamson PR, DeJesus S, Mueller RJ, Gallagher JT. Baker CH. Surgical Endoscopy 2010;24 Supplement 1: 298-313
  4. The Use of the Detachable Anvil for Hemorrhoidopexy. Kim R, Ferrara A, Itriago F, Gallagher JT, Williamson PR, DeJesus SD, Mueller RJ. Surgical Endoscopy 2010; 25 Supplement: 545
  5. Best Surgical Thinking - Part I Stapled Transanal Rectal Resection (STARR): What’s New? Bahna H, Ferrara A. J Am Coll Surg 2010; online publication
  6. Stapled Transanal Rectal Resection (STARR) Successfully treats Obstructed Defecation Syndrome (ODS): A single Institution Experience. Burns l, Bahna H, Ferrara A, Williamson PR, DeJesus S, Mueller RJ, Gallagher JT. Dis Colon Rectum 2010;53: 535
  7. In a minimally invasive Colorectal practice that offers both hand-assisted and Laparoscopic assisted Colorectal surgery: Which patients truly undergo minimally invasive surgery?. Mizrahi B, Ferrara A, Williamson PR, DeJesus S, Mueller RJ, Gallagher JT. Dis Colon Rectum 2010;53: 667-668
  8. Immune Response After Open, Laparoscopic, and Hand-Assisted Colon & Rectal Resections. Bahna H, Loh B, Donigan M, Norcross LA, Aversa J, Ferrara M, Williamson PR, DeJesus S, Mueller RJ, Ferrara A, Gallagher JT, Baker C. Dis Colon Rectum 2010;53: 672-673.
  9. Best Surgical Thinking - Part II Stapled Transanal Rectal Resection (STARR): What’s New? Bahna H, Ferrara A. J Am Coll Surg 2011; online publication
  10. Comparison of Tumor Regression Grade in the Rectal Wall and TNM Staging after Preoperative Neoadjuvant Therapy as a Predictor of Nodal Status and Disease Free Survivial. Kim R, Rich A, Ferrara A, Itriago F, Cravens J, Li S, Gallagher JT, Williamson PR. Dis Colon Rectum 2011;54(5): e127
  11. Long Term Results of Obstructed Defecation Syndrome after Stapled Transanal Rectal Resection. Steven R, Bahna H, Ferrara A, Itriago F, Gallagher JT, Williamson PR, DeJesus S, Mueller RJ. Dis Colon Rectum 2011;54(5): e97